World Chocolate Day

July 7th marks World Chocolate Day; a day of feasting, fun, and of course chocolate. As one of the most famous foods ever, the cocoa bean has taken the world by storm and created one of the largest industries to date. Last year the chocolate market was valued at £4.2bn, up from the previous year’s £3.96bn valuation, and us Brits aren’t showing any signs of slowing down. The average person eats 11 kilograms of chocolate every year, which is more than any other country in the world. In the US chocolate sales are record-breaking, with many expected to reach $22.4bn in 2017. In ode to our favourite food, here are some really interesting chocolate facts and figures to get you in the mood for World Chocolate Day.

Chocolate was once used as currency

Can you imagine a world where the chocolate coin isn’t just a gimmick? The ancient Mayan world was just that, and the prized cocoa bean was a precious commodity that was highly sought after. Cocoa bean production was even limited to ensure the bean wasn’t devalued in any way. With the industry currently valued at £4.2bn each year in the UK alone, it seems the Mayan culture still lives on within us today.

Chocolate has a huge demand and supply

With such prominent demand, the chocolate stocks need to be huge. Each year a cocoa tree can produce enough beans to make 400-800 bars of chocolate – that’s why millions of trees are needed to supplement this vast industry.

The Ivory Coast is the largest producer of cocoa trees, supplying 37% of the world’s demand. It was reported in 2010 that rivals, Mars and Hershey’s, have been funding the research and implementation into genetically modified cocoa plants in order to harvest optimal yield.

Cold chocolate? Surely not

That’s right… Back in Mayan and Aztec times chocolate was always brewed as a cold drink. The beans were crushed and mixed with water, leaving behind a concoction that was cold and full of antioxidants and a plethora of vitamins and minerals.

Chocolate keeps you awake… or does it?

The average bar of chocolate contains less than 10 milligrams of caffeine, which is an incredibly small amount. Dark chocolate has considerably more, boasting 79 milligrams of caffeine. It’s very similar to the caffeine content in a can of Coke.

Chocolate sales are reaching new heights

Brussels airport is where the most chocolate is sold worldwide. Travellers purchase over 800 tonnes of the stuff every single year.

Now that’s plane dedication!

Have we been lied to all our lives?

Not really as it’s a well-known fact that white chocolate isn’t actually chocolate at all. It’s mainly milk, cocoa solids and cocoa butter with a sprinkle of vanilla flavouring. It gives a whole new meaning to the phrase ‘You’ve been sold a Dream’, because in this case you probably have.

It’s a bug’s life

What do a computer and a chocolate bar have in common? Both contain bugs! We hope you like I’m A Celeb because the average chocolate bar contains eight bug pieces. According to food regulatory boards this is inevitable, and is deemed safe for consumption. The FDA (Food & Drug Administration) has a regulation policy stating that a chocolate bar can be sold with up to 60 bug parts inside before it becomes unsafe to eat. Crunchy…

Need a chocolate fix delivered straight to your office? We here at Kudos Delivered have been office caterers for decades and can deliver fresh lunches straight to you.

Did you enjoy this blog? Then you’ll love our Doughnut Day recap